Shop locally for Christmas

Another super‐brief post, this time about forthcoming art & craft shopping events.

Today and through the rest of the weekend is SE5 Art Weekend, with open days at 11 Vestry Mews, 5 Grace’s Mews, and Vanguard Court Studios, and a show in Myatt’s Fields Park’s Roundhouse.

There will be a Made In Camberwell Christmas sale at The Tiger on 7th December.

And Mini Moderns will have an open studio weekend on 13th‐15th December.

Author: Peter

Long-time resident of Camberwell, author of this blog since July 2004.

7 thoughts on “Shop locally for Christmas”

  1. Dulwich Hamlet host Wealdstone this afternoon in a top 5 clash at Champion Hill (next to Sainsburys on Denmark Hill) that should be a real treat. tied on 35 points each from 16 games, and with games in hand over the sides above them — this is a very appetising match between two good teams.

    Come along at 3pm and enjoy what should be a great atmosphere at a terrifically friendly little local club. who just so happen to play excellent possession and passing football.

    Dulwich could certainly use a little extra support today — the club was slapped with a £29k bill from EDF for unpaid electricity usage that the fans are alarmed about to say the least… could certainly put the future in a bit of jeopardy.

  2. THAT IS A GOOD CLASH. Mm.

    After the game, why not drop by LYNDHURST WINTER FAIR 3–6p and warm up on mulled wine and cakes? Lyndhurst can boast several winners of STRICTLY COME BAKING.

  3. That was a heavy defeat for Hamlet, but Wealdstone have Scott McLeish playing for them, for instance, a League veteran. Lord knows, Johnny Haynes played three games for them at the end of his career.

    Hamlet had 843 people there today, biggest gate in their league. Had it not clashed with Lyndhurst Winter Fair, there would have been more.

  4. Three of the wealdstone squad were in Payless food and wine at about quarter to eight. Seemed like nice blokes but the lad with a little neck tattoo couldn’t hold on to his post match drink and had to sneak a wee wee on the bins before getting in the car.

    Lyndhurst fair was Ibizan foam party themed. Not bad for the second best local primary.

  5. The Payless sports diet and fitness regime is admired throughout the whole of Wealdstone and as far as Kenton, Northwick Park and South Harrow.

    Glad you enjoyed the foam theme, Alan. Dog Kennel Hill Primary is indeed above Lyndhurst, but we had huskies, which ticks the Ofsted husky box.

    The festive season is underway. Bring on Noddy.

  6. It was a heavy defeat for the Hamlet but a minor setback…they will be back stronger than ever…Wealdstone was also where Stuart “Phycho” Pearce started out…

    843 was a very good gate…lets see if we can get 1000+ for the christmas/new year fixtures (weather permitting)

    Dec 26th 3.00pm Grays Athletic
    Jan 04th 3.00pm Metropolitan Police

  7. Dulwich Hamlet is fab over the festive season, like Tuscany amongst the poplars up there, like soccer amongst the allotments but with a proper stadium not a damp shed. A thousand fans will shake them sun‐dried tomatoes.

    The next big thing on television is going to be allotments after Strictly Come Baking and the rest. In time for Christmas a 10 quid book appears from the trash as a brilliant present for our tenders of the tendrils and beatniks of the beetroots.

    http://www.souvenirpress.co.uk/2013/08/the-joy-of-allotments/

    This odd, greengaging and beautifully produced book is unique in the field of books, let alone gardening books or allotment books. It’s a kind of Beano, packed with wacky yarns of the inner world of the allotment as much as the gritty reality. It’s also like a mediaeval illuminated manuscript — everything is delicately hand‐drawn, hand‐coloured and hand‐written. The typography is magnificently organic. And just when you think the gingham may finally be descending on the lid of the plum jam, pests and predators bite you on the ankles — slugs, badgers, parakeets.

    Consider this, written in the sweetest type: “Snails are easily killed by stamping on them.” Nicey‐poos? “A short, sharp death.” To be enjoyed at pottering pace, this book will send you back to appreciate your own life and its creative potential, its pools of quiet and room to grow, at a slowed pace, to the sound of birdsong on the edge of town, far away from the rattling, chattering clamour of corporate propaganda and back in the homegrown plot of your own being.

    Well done Caroline Deput. Your book not only takes the biscuit, it is a slice of the sublime.

Comments are closed.